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................... GaukerHeadshot Christopher Gauker is, and has been since 2014, the Professor for Theoretical Philosophy at the University of Salzburg, Austria. He works both in the philosophy of language and the philosophy of mind. His books include Words without Meaning (MIT 2003) and Words and Images: An Essay on the Origin of Ideas (Oxford 2011). In the former he developed a nonreferential semantics grounded in the notion of context-relativity. In the latter, he explained how imagistic cognition can support the acquisition and use of language as a tool of interpersonal cooperation. Gauker's personal website  
     
  NanayHeadshot Bence Nanay is BOF Research Professor at the Centre for Philosophical Psychology at the University of Antwerp and Senior Research Associate at Peterhouse, Cambridge University. He is the author three books (Between Perception and Action, Oxford University Press, 2013 and Aesthetics as Philosophy of Perception, Oxford University Press, 2016, Aesthetics: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press, 2019) with one more under contract (Seeing Things You Don’t See, Oxford University Press) as well as more than 120 peer-reviewed articles. His work is supported by a number of high profile grants including a ERC Consolidator Grant. Nanay's personal website  
       
  Barnerheadshot Alma Barner is a postdoctoral fellow in the project in the Philosophy Department at the University of Salzburg. Before that, she was a postdoctoral fellow with Bence Nanay in the Centre for Philosophical Psychology at the University of Antwerp. She completed her PhD at the Australian National University in 2018. Her research concerns the perspectival nature of imagination, the normativity of imagination, collective imagination and the relationship between memory and imagination. She has additional research interests in the role of imagistic reasoning in mathematics and the sciences.  
       
  Beningerheadshot Max Beninger is postdoctoral fellow in the project in the Philosophy Department at the University of Salzburg. He completed his Ph.D. at Duke University in 2019, under the supervision of Karen Neander and Felipe De Brigard. His dissertation examined the nature of working memory and its relationship to other mental phenomena, such as attention and consciousness. Max’s current interests include the process of mental manipulation (especially, how it can be used to guide action), and the role of mental imagery in working memory. Beninger's personal website  
       
  AshbyPic Brandon James Ashby completed his B.Phil. at the University of Oxford in 2012 and his Ph.D. in Philosophy at the University of Arizona in 2020. His work focuses on the scope and nature of perceptual content, its relationship to phenomenal consciousness, and its relationship to the contents of belief and different kinds of imagination and memory. He defends phenomenal schematics: the claim that the phenomenal characters of our perceptual experiences have a systematic and compositional structure. His current work concerns the theoretical foundations of the Helmholtzian paradigm of perceptual psychology and its ability to serve as a categorical basis for the phenomenal characters of our perceptual experiences. He is in the process of developing arguments showing that perception is a modeling process: one that successfully represents some aspects of reality by systematically misrepresenting other aspects. Ashby' personal website    
       
  EcheverriHeadshot2 Santiago Echeverri is a postdoctoral fellow in the project at the Centre for Philosophical Psychology at the University of Antwerp. Before that, he held research positions at New York University, Rutgers University, and the University of Geneva. He has investigated the representations underlying our ability to perceptually segment and keep track of objects. He has published several articles on this topic in venues like British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Pacific Philosophical Quarterly, and Philosophy of Science. Santiago’s current research concerns the structure of iconic mental representations, their relations to discursive representations, and the structure of perceptual justification. Echeverri’s personal website: https://www.secheverri.com    
       
  MuellerHeadshot Stephen Müller is a PhD student supported by the project. Stephen has long-standing interests located at the interdisciplinary interface connecting psychology and philosophy, broadly construed. In 2017 he completed his Master's degree in Psychology at the University of Salzburg by conducting experimental work on decision-making in moral dilemmas. In 2018 he completed his Master's degree in Philosophy at the University of Salzburg, with a thesis centered around the "mental file" framework as it is applied in empirical psychology. His current main interests revolve around the philosophy and cognitive science of perception, with a focus on the endogenous construction of mental imagery, as well as its function in broader cognitive processes such as episodic memory or visuo-spatial problem solving.    

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